If it’s not okay here, it’s not okay before we drive.
Drinking. Driving. They’re better apart.

Drink driving is one of the biggest killers on Victoria's roads, with around 1 in 5 drivers and riders killed having a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) over the legal limit of 0.05 (5 year average).

Alcohol can affect us in different ways from one day to the next – this means there's never a 'safe' amount to drink when you’re planning to drive.

The way to avoid drink driving is simple. If you're going to drink, plan not to drive. If people avoid driving after drinking, the number of road fatalities could be reduced by up to 20%.

The separation of drinking and driving is yet another demonstration of the “proof” as to how we are going to achieve a vision of zero deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Driving impairment occurs even at low BAC levels:

  • At .02 to .05 BAC – the ability to judge distances and to see or locate moving lights correctly is reduced.  The tendency to take risks is increased, and the ability to respond to several stimuli is decreased
  • .05 to .08 BAC – the ability to judge distances is further reduced, reactions are slower, and concentration span is shorter
  • At 0.08 Drivers are five times more likely to have a crash than before they started drinking
  • .08 to .12 BAC – over confidence sets in, over estimation of one’s abilities leads to reckless driving, and peripheral vision and perception of obstacles are impaired
  • At 0.12 Drivers are ten times more likely to have a crash
  • With a BAC of 0.15, the risk of being involved in a crash is more than 20 times greater than with a BAC of zero

Plan ahead. There are other options to getting home:

  • Organise a designated driver
  • Book a taxi
  • Check out public transport options
Drinking and Driving, they're better apart

More Information

  • Drink Driving Background

  • Drink Driving Statistics

    In the 5 years before 1987, more than 110 drivers and motorcycle riders who lost their lives each year had a BAC greater than 0.05g/100ml. This has reduced to an average of 28 drivers and riders who lost their lives each year with a BAC greater than 0.05g/100ml from 2011-2015. In 2016, there were 34 drivers and riders who lost their lives with a BAC greater than 0.05g/100ml.

    The proportion of drivers and motorcycle riders who lost their lives with a BAC greater than 0.05g/100ml has declined from 38% in 1987 to 19% in 2016.

    Since 1997, Victoria Police have breath tested more than 24 million drivers and riders from Booze Bus operations, catching more than 75,000 drivers and riders with an illegal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) during this period.

    The vast majority (99.7%) of drivers tested do not exceed their legal blood alcohol levels, however, in the last 5 years, close to 1 in 5 drivers and riders who lost their lives had a BAC greater than 0.05.


    Drink drivers BAC graph


    In Summary

    The majority (99.7%) of drivers tested did not exceed their legal blood alcohol levels, however, close to 1 in 5 drivers and riders who lost their lives in the last 5 years had a BAC greater than 0.05.

    See the TAC drink driving campaigns.


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  • Facts About Drinking and Driving